dorms-big

​IDC Herzliya Begins Construction of Student Housing

APR 4,2017

The Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya began the construction project for student housing. The housing project will include 750 rooms in three 13-storey towers that will be built on a total area of 29,000 square meters. Minrav won the tender for constructing the project, designed by Schwartz Besnosoff Architects and Town Planners LTD, and it is expected to be completed within 18 months.

The student housing project was planned and designed to meet the standards of green construction and to meet the needs of the students. In order to serve as a home for the students and is designed to induce an academic atmosphere: on each floor, study areas will be set up to enable students to pursue academic excellence alongside a diverse social life. The housing project was formulated in accordance to a long-standing approach that views IDC Herzliya as an anchor and lever for the growth of residential neighborhoods in its vicinity.

The need to establish student housing derives from the continuous increase in students from all over the world attending the International School, which now accounts for about 30% of all students at IDC Herzliya. The Raphael Recanati International School at IDC Herzliya is unique in the academic landscape in Israel and offers full study programs for undergraduate and graduate degrees, which are taught in English.

The RRIS was established in 2001 in order to deepen the connection between Israel and the Diaspora and has been growing since its establishment: The number of students currently stands at 2,000 students coming from more than 80 countries. Many of students at IDC choose to continue living in Israel at the end of their studies (About 70%), enlist in the IDF, establish a family or business, and others return to their countries of origin and become ambassadors of good will of the State of Israel.

IDC Herzliya was founded in 1994 by its president, Prof. Uriel Reichman, in order to train the future leadership of the State of Israel at the highest level through a unique model of excellence in research and teaching, with an emphasis on social responsibility and community involvement. Like the Ivy League in the United States, IDC chose not to receive funding from the government budget system of higher education, as part of a worldview that seeks not to take anything from the state, but to contribute as much as possible to it. In full, by tuition, donations and research grants, thereby enabling the IDC Herzliya to have absolute academic and administrative independence, in addition to meeting the highest academic standards.

During its years of existence, without any public support, IDC has succeeded in being a pioneer in many fields and leading a revolution in Israel’s higher education system, the traces of which can now be seen in other academic institutions.

Top